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Late 2012, or Self (Publishing) Help: How to Be a Baller Client

Flowers from Susan Norris

Flowers from Susan Norris

Late in 2012, I had the honor of working with two excellent writers.

These authors are not excellent because they and I share a bit of commonality in terms of literary goals and aesthetics, they were excellent because they were wonderful to work with.

The authors were REKTOK ross, author of YA Inspirational Romance, and Susan Norris, author of YA Agenda Fiction.

REKTOK’s book, Prodigal, had already been through a number of substantial developmental edits when I saw it. I did the copy edit, and I had some significant notes. Of course, though the author was tired and finished, was still willing to stay the course and make some considerable changes that made the story tighter, more believable, and ultimately, more marketable.

Susan Norris’s book, Rescuing Hope, was a mission from God. That’s how she tells it. She spent a lot of time on her knees before her maker, begging for an easier path. But in the end, she wrote it. About human sex trafficking.  And Susan’s book is only a sliver of her work on that important issue. You can get more information and links from the post just below this one.

If you’re considering self-publishing, I encourage you to be as much like REKTOK and Susan as possible.

Here’s How:

1. I’ve said it before, but Engage Professional Editors.

2. Listen to your professional editors. We usually have years of experience tweaking stories and have read more stories than most people. Susan and REKTOK were both incredibly easy to work with–and I’m sure they both had to beat their inner diva off with a stick from time to time.  In REKTOK’s case, I think it helped that I added a lot of humor to my comments, REKTOK chuckled while reading them to me over the phone when we were talking through some things.  But still. It is never ever exactly pleasant (though after a time, it becomes exciting and revelatory) to read comments, no matter how delicately worded, that ostensibly say “up your game, fool.”

3. Be a class act.  Understand that professional editors are perfectly willing to negotiate their fees.  Both Susan and REKTOK chose from a number of editing packages that I offered, and neither of them got my proposal and then ran away, never to be heard from again, which is the thing that happens more often. I suspect, if they’d opted to use someone else’s services, they would’ve let me know.

4. Pay when you say you will. As a freelance editor and writer, I am paid on all kinds of wonky schedules. I am always willing to work with clients to figure out something that works for them, but it is always a complete joy when a client says, “The check’s in the mail,” and I get it three, not thirty, days later.

5. You are paying for your editor’s time, so if you need a phone call or an extra email, or some clarification on some comment or another, ask for it. This editor is only too happy to oblige.  And I would a million times prefer to clarify something than to have a client run off and weep or whine or, worse still, post nasty reviews or troll.

6. Thank your editor. I am talking about a polite phrase here, not gifts or flowers like the ones above for my birthday, which happened in the middle of the project with Susan. I appreciated those flowers. I never understood about getting flowers before because they always came from some kind of obligatory social convention–prom, valentine’s day, being in a show–but those flowers from Susan were wonderful. They represented a vote of confidence, a kindness, thoughtfulness.  But your editor is not expecting flowers. I would be as thrilled to have worked with Susan with or without them. Your editor is not the enemy. She is can be your biggest cheerleader and greatest ally.  She is probably a writer, too.  She understands what you’re going through.  This is not Us vs. Them.  This is team work, sometimes friendship, and always giving the world better art.

Editors, what would you add to this list? Writers, what do you want from your editor?

6 comments on “Late 2012, or Self (Publishing) Help: How to Be a Baller Client

  1. I adore my editor. I met her through my first traditional publisher and I will happily hire her for any project into the future. She makes my work better, and it shows in the reviews.

    Anybody who doesn’t want to be edited needs to get out of writing.

    As a reader, I wish it was easier to tell at a glance if a book is professionally edited or not. I’d read more indie if it was clear. At the moment, I’ve gone off indie after a third book in a row that is so riddled with errors as to be painful to read, and that last one was someone who talks about professional editing so I assumed she’d had it done. Apparently not.

    I think it helps me to have been a practicing journalist early on in my writing career. Journalists expect to be edited and aren’t heartbroken when it happens (or at least, they don’t last long if they are). More fiction writers need to get it in their heads that the reader has as much a right to enjoy the text as the writer does.

    • I love your thoughtful comments, Kimberly.

      I agree with all you say, and I think that it would, in fact, be good to establish some kind of “indie review” service… I wonder if there’s anybody doing that on a blog… I think it’d be a worthwhile afternoon’s web search. :-)

      Yes–I think you’re right about having a background in journalism. I also think it’s helpful to take a writing workshop or two, helps you to know what kinds of comments to anticipate.

  2. April,
    You were a joy to work with. Thank you for opening yourself up to this difficult topic and for pouring yourself into Hope’s story. Your time and dedication as well as your friendship blessed me.

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